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of these cuts is about 2 percent per department. gillette said the pentagon needs to five will round up these numbers -- 100 new soldiers. his limited tiring 98? of course not. he hires the full 100 but less somewhere else, like maybe janitors that west pointer in the pentagon, not to become the pentagon and not to pick my friends a west point, but the point is, the president has executive authority to make sure the government works properly. in fact, he is required to make sure it works properly. his of says, he promises faithfully to execute the office of president of the united states. that word faithfully is in the constitution, and it is in his of to make sure that the government works, that he does not use government agencies to harm his political opponents and help his political supporters. after eight. ashley: that good faith to me because their role in it for their own political gain, the political part, and they're not always making decisions. >> i'll tell you this. if the president of the united states of america furloughs a sufficient number of tsa agents so that we have to
lawmakers talking about passing what's called transfer authority enabling these agencies, the pentagon and others, to set priorities and not this draconian sequester setup. the white house is saying that they may not be in favor of that. so you have this standoff that it appears the sequester's going to move forward just as it is. jon: we'll just see how bad it is. a lot of people say the politicians are sort of hyping the damage that we can expect starting friday. we'll see. bret baier from "special report." thank you. you can watch bret on "special report," all of the latest political developments, and this is going to be a big week, 6 p.m. eastern right here on fox news channel. jenna: well, u.s. special forces who risk their lives to defend the people of afghanistan, the innocent people of afghanistan, are under fire by the afghan president now. we're going to tell you what's behind hamid karzai's surprising accusations and what it means for our troops in the fight against the taliban. >>> plus, some breaking news from sin city. police naming a prime suspect in a wild shootout that
, when it comes to cuts, maybe it's not as bad as the pentagon and others are warning. because he says republicans should argue that overall defense spending is still on the rise. now, cornyn admits that this is even a change for him. help said he would listen to leon panetta and others say these across the board spending cuts would be devastating. but he says he looked into it and he decided the best message for himself and other republicans, and of course this is the number two senate republican, is to say, you know what, maybe it's not going to be that bad. but as you well know, wolf, arguing that any cuts in military spending is an anthem ma to most republicans so i would imagine he's going to get some backlash on that messaging when he talks to republicans about it tomorrow. >> when it comes to gop legislation to prevent the negative impact from the sequester, what are you hearing, what's going on? >> reporter: what's going on right now is there is sort of the leading idea among senate republicans for a proposal that they will probably vote on this week. is to give the president f
it through the bureaucracies of the pentagon. america needs chuck as our secretary of defense to bring our troops home and keep our military the strongest in the world. sergeant hagel was an american hero. when so many americans were dodging the draft he volunteered to serve in vietnam. the draft board gave him the option to return to college but chuck refused. he said i think the best thing for me is to go in the army. it may not be the best thing for the army but i think that's the way to get all this straightened out. yfsz the oldest of four boys, he said, my sphawr passed away and i just was not coming together the way i should. there was a war going on in vietnam, i felt a sense of some responsibility so i said no, i think it's time to go. and so i volunteered for the draft. went in the army and celebrated my 21st birthday in white sands missile range. and chuck didn't serve in a safe bullet. when assigned to germany he volunteered for vietnam and saw the horrors of war as an infrant fantdry sergeant. he hand his brother tom are the only known american brothers to serve side by side i
their motivations are. more on that in moment. first, too chris lawrence at the pentagon. the turkish government says it does have more sense of who the attacker was. >> yeah, erin, they think it's a man ichevich sham li, member of the revolution people's liberation party. they say he trained in europe how to make bombs and has attacked turkish military and police officials before. right now they're doing dna tests to confirm his i. dix. the group is a throwback to the cold war, a far left revolutionary group that wants to overthrow turkey's government and establish some sort of communist state. >> why would they target the u.s. embassy? >> they are anti-capitalist. and they're very, very opposed to the u.s. and nato. analysts say probably two reasons for this attack. one is to embarrass the turkish government. two is to protest the presence of u.s. patriot missiles on turkish soil. right now, 400 american troops are in turkey and they are moving that patriot missile battery into position on turkey's border with syria. turkey requested that help because of the mortars flying in from syria and th
of the marriage act. the pentagon has temporarily grounded a powerful fleet of fire jets over a discovered crack in the engine blades. six tanks at a nuclear site holding radioactive waste are leaking. the do not pose an immediate threat to public safety. good morning, it is "the washington journal." our first 45 minutes this morning, we are going to ask you about paid sick leave. lawmakers in six states are trying to make paid six time -- paid sick time our requirement. 25% of par to employees to not get paid sick days. we are asking you, should paid sick days be a federal mandate? if you want to reach out was on social media, you can tweet us. we have 35, is already on facebook. and you can always e-mail us at legislators step up for paid sick leave. some pretty 9% of private-sector workers are not entitled to paid time off when they fall ill according to the bureau of labor statistics. low-wage and part-time workers, particularly those who work at small firms or who work in restaurants, are among the least likely to get paid sixth time. to change that, democratic lawmakers and
. the house republicans are putting in a provision that will give agency heads especially at the pentagon the flexibility to decide how cuts are to be administered. the white house is resisting that. this is the empire, the empire striking back, stuart. big bloated government is going to fight for every penny it can get. even though it's only a penny on the dollar they're going to fight fiercely for it they know if it's done once it might be done again. stuart: let me summarize this. we would have these cuts in place until the end of march, and then, because we need to organize our government finances. >> because we haven't had a budget. stuart: we haven't had a budget, those cuts would stay in place and still be cutting the budget, but agency heads would be allowed to say we'll cut the conference budget, we won't cut personnel. >> yes. stuart: we'll cut the school janitor, but not the teacher say that after march 27th. >> that's what the republicans are moving toward. stuart: i can't see how the president could resist that. >> he wants to resist because the cuts would take place, for onc
. the boys mother said she can't describe how incredible it is to hold her son again. the pentagon is expected to announce soon that it will begin extending some benefits to same-sex couples who previously have been denied. it's not clear how extensive the list of additional benefits will be. the move comes about a year and a half after the official end of don't ask, don't tell. >>> some students from sandy hook elementary will be part of the preshow for this sunday's grammy awards. children recently recorded "over the rainbow" to help newtown, connecticut, heal from the december tragedy at that school. a different group of newtown children performed at the super bowl with jennifer hudson. >>> and it's not exactly nemo, but an orange and white gold fish has found a human friend. the disabled fish now sports, take a look closely, special sling to help it get around the tank. its owner says the fish may look silly but he adds it's better than lying at the bottom of the tank all day. i add it's better than floating at the top. it is now nine minutes after the hour. now let's get a che
of the c-span video library at live now to the pentagon for a briefing on civilian layoffs related to the pending sequester cuts happening next week. >> we have notified congress today about potential furlough. today with us we have our undersecretary, mr. robert hale and acting undersecretary jessica wright. here to address questions they do have some comments they would like to start with with respect to sequestration and the actual action that we took today with congress on furlough. then they will be available to take your questions. i will help them in getting your questions address. >> okay. well, good afternoon. today the department faces some the enormous budgetary uncertainty really imperiled in my experience. possibility of sequestration starting on march 1st. by the end of march could mean a 46 billion-dollar reduction in our total topline 9% in all of our accounts except military personnel including wartime accounts. we will protect the wartime operating accounts, but that means larger, disproportionate cuts in the base budget operation and maintenance accounts.
there's so many installations of military and defense workers. the pentagon noted more than 700,000 civilian military workers, department of defense workers, will effectively lose 20% of their pay. they will have to work one less day a week if this goes in effect. as one observer put it, it's like a low speed car crash heading our way. >> peter alexander from 1600. peter, thank you, sir. >>> wednesday morning the supreme court will hear arguments in a case called shelby county versus holder. it's a case that could determine the future of the landmark voting rights act of 1965. to find out what's at stake, we're going to go ahead and take a reality check on this sunday. peter bacon an msnbc contributor and editor of the grio. let's start at the beginning, if you will, for folks not following the story perhaps. what's at stake here on wednesday? >> the key thing at stake here is this is a law -- this is 1965, that lays out basically for a lot of southern states, states that had a history of discrimination, they had -- the big portion is they have to usually pre-clear any law about
in discretionary. we could actually clean all the waste out of the pentagon which is well over $100 billion a year. it still doesn't solve our problem. we cannot solve our problem unless we change medicare to save it and put a competitive model into our health care system that will allocate that scarce resource. it's really interesting. just yesterday the cms has finished going through all this bidding on durable medical equipment. and the statement coming from cms, for the first time, is hey, we just figured out competition works. about a 41% savings on durable medical equipment not just for the federal government but for the seniors who are going to be doing their co-pay. so competition works. and if it will work -- it works in this area, health care will work in the rest. we've just got to have a little pain. that happened to me as a child frequently with a popular switch. >> okay. well, there you go. >> there's a bumper sticker for 2014. >> chuck, good morning. senator, good morning. chuck, quick question for you. what are the odds you place on sequester going through and two, a government shu
until today to make these announcements. do you accept the criticism that the pentagon should have been we listed every major item we are talking about. we said we had to do furloughs. we said there would be cutbacks in readiness. we said unit costs would go up. all the same things. what we didn't do with a detailed budget planning and i don't regret that. we wouldn't have known the effects of the continuing resolution. we wouldn't have known that congress is going to change the size and the. moreover, we would have incurred the productivity and we would v done it six months ago, so i don't regret not doing that. i think we did sound the alarm in every way we could. >> i am wondering what kind of contract you are having with the white house and with congress there is going to have to be some. so are you trying to offer any solutions? also, i am wondering, what other things would you be doing right now if you were not spending all your time on this sequester. >> spending time with my wife -- i think i am hot the right person to answer. we are responsible for providing the nation's securi
. the president following -- traveling to newport, virginia, an area happy with pentagon contracts, military construction, and the navy shipyard. what are you looking for? guest: the most interesting thing will be debates in the senate. if democrats are able to win over enough republicans to get a compromise deal through, that will really upset the equation. it would be very much unexpected. but that is maybe our one chance to offer the sequester at this point. more likely, it will be a vote where democrats put a plan forward, it cannot garner enough republican support, and it fails. a republican plan is put forward and also does not pass. the democrats control the senate. then, republicans will say the democrats could not pass a plan. the democrats will say, republicans have one to do what? they blocked a compromise plan in the senate. there will be a lot of finger- pointing, a lot of gamesmanship. it will be interesting to see if one side or the other is able to garner a political advantage. host: justin sink, who is following this story for "the hill" newspaper. >> here is a look at our
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)